Looking at Cryptocurrency Mining and GPUs (Graphic ...

Evaluating baking in a o% fee exchange vs a 10% fee standard baker

Ok, first the context:
I am an old crypto investor. I mined Bitcoin, when it was still doable with GPUs. I still have some rigs working (using Nicehash).
I participated in Tezos ICO (the only one I participated in). My only major positions are in Bircoin and Tezos, but I have several small positions in Ether, Litecoin, Nano, etc..
I am comfortable with computers (have a PhD in Computer Engineering, etc.)
I have operational accounts in several exchanges - mainly Bitstamp, Kraken and Binance.
I must start by stating that I like the new possibility of placing PoS "coins" in a good exchange and letting them handle the details of staking.
When Coinbase started that new trend, I didn't think much about it. I don't like Coinbase. Closed my account there long ago. And the fee is stupid.
But Binance with 0% fee is a different story. Binance is one of the exchanges I use at present. And 0% is a very good fee...
So This time I had to really think about what to do with my Tezos. Keep my present baker? Or send them to Binance?
And so for the substance:
At present I'm paying a fee of 10%, to avoid the hassle of baking myself. That reduces my yearly "returns" from around 6.3% (or something close to that) to some 5.7% (in fact the return is only somewhat meaningful in relation to the inflation, and even then it is debatable, but let's forget all that).
Now in Binance, which I trust for small, relatively short-term positions, I would get the full 6.3%.
The difference between having my keys, my direct control of my Tezos and using a standard for-profit baker and having them stored in an exchange baking with 0% fee is 0.6 to 0.65% yearly "return".
So, I really thought about it, but decided to leave the baking with my present baker. He works reasonably well, never failed paying my share, and I keep full control of my Tezos. In principle I will only lose them if I, myself, do something stupid.
Binance is a good exchange, but no exchange is 100% safe from some mishap.
I prefer to lose 0.6% per year to avoid the exchange-related risk, which I assume to be reasonably small, but I can't really calculate (but may well be above 1% of bankruptcy risk per year).
I believe this is the kind of reasoning everybody must make. If the risk evaluation of most Tezos holders is similar to mine, the independent bakers will survive.
submitted by Seriousoldman to tezos [link] [comments]

Transcript of Open Developer Meeting In Discord - 5/10/2019

[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
Channel should be open now
Chill05/10/2019
you all rock!
just getting that out of the way :wink:
Tron05/10/2019
Cheers everyone.
theking05/10/2019
Hi fabulous dev team!
Hans_Schmidt05/10/2019
Howdy!
Tron05/10/2019
No specific agenda today.
Questions?
Has everyone seen Zelcore wallet, and Spend app?
theDopeMedic05/10/2019
Any major development status updates that haven't been listed in #news?
Synicide05/10/2019
How was the meetup yesterday? I heard it would be recorded, it is uploaded anywhere yet?
Tron05/10/2019
And Trezor support on Mango Farm assets?
@Synicide Yes it was recorded. The Bitcoin meetup organizer has the video.
I talked about Ravencoin, but mostly about the stuff that was being built on/with/for Ravencoin.
There was about 70% overlap with folks who were at the Ravencoin meetup in March.
Synicide05/10/2019
awesome, looking forward to watching it when it's available
Tron05/10/2019
I'll hit up James and see if he's posting the video.
S1LVA | GetRavencoin.org05/10/2019
@theDopeMedic I'd follow github if youre interested in development status
Synicide05/10/2019
zelcore looks super slick. Been meaning to research its security more with the username/pw being stored on device
Chill05/10/2019
How is the progress on the restricted assets and testnet coming along? A secondary question would be about the approximate fork timeframe.
S1LVA | GetRavencoin.org05/10/2019
Has anyone heard from the community dev (BW) working on Dividends?
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
Any word on BW and his progress w dividends?
@S1LVA | GetRavencoin.org LOL
Tron05/10/2019
@S1LVA | GetRavencoin.org Great question. I haven't heard.
Synicide05/10/2019
last meeting BlondFrogs said he would try to connect with BW as he was sick with the flu at the time. Maybe he has an update
S1LVA | GetRavencoin.org05/10/2019
I've tried to get in contact, but with no success.
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
Got a funny feeling...
Jeroz05/10/2019
Last time we left off with someone mentioning a foundation and Tron saying let’s discuss that next time iirc
kryptoshi05/10/2019
Has anyone taken a look at the merits for this proposal? Thoughts? https://medium.com/systems-nexus/modified-x16r-algorithm-proposal-for-constant-hash-rate-in-short-time-164711dd9044
Medium
Modified X16R algorithm proposal for constant hash rate in short time
Interpretation Lens V. a0.01
Tron05/10/2019
I did see it. Does anyone think this is a problem?
Synicide05/10/2019
It looks interesting... but I'm not sure what it is trying to solve. Looking at netstats, our 1 hour average block time is perfectly 1 minute
S1LVA | GetRavencoin.org05/10/2019
Last I heard from him he expressed how important finishing the code was. I wouldnt jump to conclusions on his absence within the community.
Synicide05/10/2019
x16r by nature will fluctuate, but DGW seems to be doing a good job keeping consistent block times
Tron05/10/2019
Because of relatively broad distribution across the algorithms, the block times are fairly consistent. It is possible, but very, very unlikely to get a sequence that takes up to 4x longer, but that's super rare, and only 4 minutes.
We did some timing analysis of the algorithms early on. A few are 1/2 as long as SHA-256 and some are up to 4x longer. But when you randomly select 16 it usually comes out about even.
Synicide05/10/2019
1hr avg: 1.02min - 24hr avg: 1min
I think we should focus on building, and not trying to fix what isnt necessarily broken
Tron05/10/2019
Agreed.
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
Agreed
Tron05/10/2019
Is everyone ok with the frequency (every other week) of this discussion?
Jeroz05/10/2019
(Added thumbs down to measure)
Tron05/10/2019
@Jeroz Did you do thumbs-up and thumbs down?
S1LVA | GetRavencoin.org05/10/2019
Seems appropriate. Its not like the devs dont poke around here and chat anyways.
Tron05/10/2019
Anything critical that we should be aware of?
Jeroz05/10/2019
When I need a dev, I poke a dev. When that dev is unavailable. I poke another one :smiley:
Hans_Schmidt05/10/2019
BlondFrogs was testing some github code last month to create a dividends snapshot database of asset holders at a given blockheight. Is that planned for inclusion? That's the only thing needed for dividends.
Jeroz05/10/2019
I hope I didn’t offend any devs
With poking around
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
Was thinking voting would be an excellent use case for restricted assets. Local communities, nations, etc... could kyc their residents
radiodub05/10/2019
Is x16r will remain fpga mineable
Tron05/10/2019
@Jeroz We're hard to offend.
Chill05/10/2019
Is the general dev feeling that the next fork should and will include everything needed for the next 6-9 months (barring something completely unforeseen)?
Jeroz05/10/2019
I know :smile:
Tron05/10/2019
@radiodub Nearly impossible to stop FPGAs and still keep GPUs
Jeroz05/10/2019
About that: voting is another hard fork right? Not too soon?
Tron05/10/2019
FPGAs can be reprogrammed as fast. It is silicon (true ASIC) that we can obsolete with a tiny change.
@Jeroz Messaging, voting, Tags, Restricted Assets would require a hard fork (upgrade).
We could do them each individually, but folks get weary of upgrades, so current plan is to roll them together into one.
MrFanelli™05/10/2019
Good idea
Jeroz05/10/2019
Oh voting too?
MrFanelli™05/10/2019
People will like that
Jeroz05/10/2019
I thought that was coming later
Tron05/10/2019
Voting is the one that isn't being worked on now. Tags and Restricted assets have taken precedence.
Jeroz05/10/2019
I know. But you plan on waiting to fork until voting is also done?
That would have my preference tbh
But I can see an issue with too many things at the same time
Tron05/10/2019
If someone wants to step in, we've had one of our devs sidelined and he was working on BlockBook support so more light wallets can connect to Ravencoin. Mostly test cases needed at this point.
S1LVA | GetRavencoin.org05/10/2019
Thats a pretty large upgrade.. Bigger surface for unknowns
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
At what point would RVN community consider moving to ASICs because having a Bitcoin level of security would eventually be needed?
MrFanelli™05/10/2019
Never rikki
Tron05/10/2019
@S1LVA | GetRavencoin.org 100% Lots of testing on testnet and bounties.
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
I am here :smiley:
Tron05/10/2019
@Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor There's nothing inherently wrong with ASICs but it tends to centralize to data centers and less opportunity for anyone to just run their gaming rig overnight and collect RVN.
Welcome Blondfrogs
MrFanelli™05/10/2019
Asics are too expensive. If we want normal people to mine, then we cant be an asic network
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
@Tron True but what happens when the chain needs a Bitcoin level of protection?
Tron05/10/2019
More GPUs, more FPGAs
MrFanelli™05/10/2019
Nvidia loves ravencoin :stuck_out_tongue:
Chill05/10/2019
ok, so we are pro FPGAs
𝕿𝖍𝖊 𝕯𝖔𝖓 𝕳𝖆𝖗𝖎𝖘𝖙𝖔 CEO ∞05/10/2019
Build it and they will come
Tron05/10/2019
It's all relative. It is cost to attack. If an ASIC isn't available for rent, then only option is rental of non-allocated GPUs
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
@Chill Eventually everyone will need FPGAs to be profitable on RVN, at that point I don't see why we just don't make the switch to ASICs
Tron05/10/2019
Also, as much as we don't focus on price, the price does matter because it determines the amount of electricity and hardware will be deployed to get the block reward. Price increase means more security, more mining means more security means higher price.
It's a circle.
Chill05/10/2019
someone tell that to the twitter handler
HailKira05/10/2019
you guys adding seedphrase to desktop wallet?
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
@HailKira We will, just is not a high priority right now.
MrFanelli™05/10/2019
Twitter handle wants rvn ded
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
I just don't see much difference between ASIC and FPGA and I'd rather have the added nethash an ASIC will provide once GPUs are virtually kicked off the network
kryptoshi05/10/2019
I'm at 11 GB future proof
Tron05/10/2019
That also limits miners to big money, not gaming rigs.
Synicide05/10/2019
@Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor you have to keep in mind the 'added nethash' is all relative
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
FPGAs will limit miners to big $$$ too IMO
Tron05/10/2019
@kryptoshi New algo x16r-12G requires 12GB :frowning:
Seal <:cricat:> Clubber05/10/2019
But sperating smaller gb cards would lead to less adoption if we ever become a mainstream coin.
Adpotion of mining that is
Chill05/10/2019
but we are a mainstream coin
Seal <:cricat:> Clubber05/10/2019
Mains stream as in what eth did
Tron05/10/2019
@Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor I agree. Not a perfect solution.
Steelers05/10/2019
Is this a Dev meeting or Algo meeting :smiley:
Seal <:cricat:> Clubber05/10/2019
But if we ever go mem lane. We should aim for 6 or 8gb.
Tron05/10/2019
Open to other questions.
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
@Tron Probably not the time and the place to have this discussion as we stand currently but IMO we're gonna have this conversation for real eventually
Seal <:cricat:> Clubber05/10/2019
Most cards have 6gb now.
kryptoshi05/10/2019
Why 12 gb ? Such a massive jump
Seal <:cricat:> Clubber05/10/2019
^
Would also like to know
Tron05/10/2019
@kryptoshi I was joking. You said you had 11GB card.
Seal <:cricat:> Clubber05/10/2019
Haha
You got em good
I cant imaghine the face he had when he was 1gb short
Lel
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
That's what she said
kryptoshi05/10/2019
Hahaha
MrFanelli™05/10/2019
need a 2080ti
Seal <:cricat:> Clubber05/10/2019
How much does the VII have?
16?
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
Any other questions you have for us?
Hans_Schmidt05/10/2019
@[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs You were testing some github code last month to create a dividends snapshot database of asset holders at a given blockheight. Is that planned for inclusion? That's the only thing needed for dividends.
Chill05/10/2019
a dev might want to contact Crypto Chico for some 'splaining
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
I still haven't contacted the developer that was working on dividends. Was pretty busy with some other stuff. I will contact him this next week, and see where we are at for that.
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
Chico doesn't do interviews, shame. Tron would be a much needed interview for his community
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
As far as releasing dividends, I can be released at anytime the code is finished and doesn't require any voting or hardfork to occur
kryptoshi05/10/2019
Android asset aware wallet?
Seal <:cricat:> Clubber05/10/2019
Is in beta right
Tron05/10/2019
Testing went well today on Android. Nearing release.
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
as it is a mechanism that is wallet specific
liqdmetal05/10/2019
no protocol level dividends you guys are saying?
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
correct
Tron05/10/2019
DM me if you want to test Android with Asset support. I'll send you the .APK.
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
RVN gonna be on tZero wallet? :yum:
liqdmetal05/10/2019
why not? what is the logic on non-protocol dividends
assets + protocol dividends is nirvana
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
dividends is pretty much sending payments to addresses. Right now, you would have to do this manually. The dividends code, will allow this to be done quicker and easier.
No consensus changes are required.
Tron05/10/2019
New Android wallet is BIP44 and original Android wallet is BIP32/BIP39 so the words will not find the funds. You'll need to send them to another wallet, and then send them to new BIP44 derived address.
liqdmetal05/10/2019
we already have payments to addresses
so dividends is not a feature so much as simple wallet script
Hans_Schmidt05/10/2019
@[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs The dividend code changes look risky'er to me than messaging. Would you consider "tags" branch test-ready?
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
Not yet @Hans_Schmidt
Dividends is easier then you would think if coded correctly. I still haven't seen the code from the community developer. Excited to view it though.
Hans_Schmidt05/10/2019
@[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs Sorry- I meant restricted, not dividend
kryptoshi05/10/2019
@Tron on the Android wallet, anyone successfully added their own node and got it to sync faster? Always have issues. I have a supped up node and cannot get it to work with the Android wallet...
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
@Hans_Schmidt Oh, that makes more sense. Yes, they are very risky! That is why we are going to create a new bug bounty program for restricted assets testing.
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
Once the network does get flooded w FPGAs, should we even consider changing the algo a couple times a year? That would only give bitstream developers added time to hoard their creations for themselves
Kind of like they're already doing with their x16r bitstreams :yum:
kryptoshi05/10/2019
Flooded... lol... like that hardware has mass production scale like gpus...come on dude
MrFanelli™05/10/2019
Bip44 wallet? :smiley:
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
@kryptoshi Eventually yes, where there's $$$ to be made, people make things happen
MrFanelli™05/10/2019
So can we trade from that in the new Binance Dex when RVN get listed?
kryptoshi05/10/2019
@Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor Yes Soon TM lol. :soontm:
Tron05/10/2019
@kryptoshi There are some things we can do to speed it up. For a new wallet, it shouldn't need to sync. For recovered wallet, it needs to sync from beginning of BIP44 wallet support on iOS so words can be moved between the two.
Other options include grabbing the first derived address and looking it up on an explorer to see when it was first used and sync from there.
Another option is to add an optional number with the 12 words so it knows when to start syncing.
There isn't a good reason on an SPV wallet to sync before the seed was created.
kryptoshi05/10/2019
Cool. Glad you are looking at speedup options.. :right_facing_fist: :left_facing_fist:
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
@MrFanelli™ If the binance dex support RVN deposits. I am sure you would be able to send from it
MrFanelli™05/10/2019
Has binance reached out for any info or anything?
I seen that we ranked in some voting competition they had on twitter
for an ama
Rikki RATTOE Sr. SEC Impresantor05/10/2019
I believe we'll need to create a fund of approximately $300,000 in order to get a BNB-RVN asset created and listed on the Binance FDEX
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
In order to work with binance we need Ravencoin integrated into Blockbook.
Tron05/10/2019
@MrFanelli™ I've reached back out to Binance on the AMA.
MrFanelli™05/10/2019
Awesome :smile:
kryptoshi05/10/2019
@Tron you are a natural on the interviews... cool as a cucumber. :sunglasses:
Tron05/10/2019
Thanks @kryptoshi
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
Cool. We are done for today.
Please don't ask us any more questions :smiley:
Tron05/10/2019
Thanks everyone!!!!
[Dev-Happy] Blondfrogs05/10/2019
Cya everyone!!
S1LVA | GetRavencoin.org05/10/2019
Cya happy feet, Thanks
Thanks Tron
Seal <:cricat:> Clubber05/10/2019
:bepbep:
submitted by mrderrik to Ravencoin [link] [comments]

My attempt at an ELI5 for cryptocurrency to help my friends.

This is a long one so fair warning and no there is no tl;dr. I've only been at this for about 6 months and worked up this paper the other day for my friends who are interested but know very little about this. Hopefully whoever reads this can make in corrections as I am far from an expert.
Blockchain
Cryptocurrency, Bitcoin, Ether are all blockchains. Blockchains are basically a spreadsheet (LEDGER) that is duplicated multiple times across a network and updated regularly simultaneously. There is no centralized version of this ledger. It is hosted simultaneously by thousands/millions of computers. These ledgers will update on their own, Bitcoin as an example automatically checks itself every 10 minutes. Each of these 10-minute increment of transactions (in bitcoins case transactions would be sending or receiving bitcoins from one person to another for goods or services) are called BLOCKS. For these blocks to be confirmed, accepted, and updated to the ledger nodes are required.
Nodes (Mining/Forging)
A node is a computer running the blockchain software on the network. The blockchain software will automatically download the entire ledger of all transactions since its inception. At regular intervals, the software will take the transactions of a block (data on the ledger) and convert them into a mathematical puzzle to be solved by randomly chosen nodes (MINING). Mining requires powerful processors (typically GPUs) and substantial quantities of energy to receive mined tokens profitably. When a specific number of nodes solve the puzzle with the same answer they are basically confirming that the data on the block is accurate as multiple independent nodes found the same answer. When confirmed, the block gets added to the previous blocks making a chain of blocks aka a blockchain. As an incentive to run your computer as a node you are rewarded with TOKENS. If a single person or group of people wanted to manipulate the ledger, the amount of machinery and electricity used to achieve the majority of miners thus allowing you to manipulate the ledger is so exponentially expensive that it serves no reasonable purpose. This is an example of a Proof of Work Blockchain System (computer solves puzzle and rewarded with tokens)
Tokens
Tokens are part of the core of the blockchain. They are an incentive to validate transactions and create blocks. They gain intrinsic value based on the blockchain they are associated with. Some blockchains grant token holder’s different abilities. With Bitcoin, tokens are needed to pay for transaction fees. Others allow voting rights on how certain blockchain functions are managed. There is a limited amount of Bitcoin that will ever be released to nodes (21 million expected to be all be released by 2033) which also keep inflation from being a problem. Blockchains can create their platform with whatever number of tokens they would like and release them or create means to mine them as they see fit. Essentially, as with any other fiat money (currency that a government has declared to be legal tender NOT backed by a physical commodity), as adoption and trust increases the value of the token will increase. If most people accept Bitcoin for services and stores accept Bitcoin for goods than it is as good as the next currency.
Wallets
Whether you mine for tokens, are paid in tokens for goods or services or purchase tokens from a person or currency exchange you need a place to store them securely and a way to send and receive them. Cryptocurrency Wallets don’t store currency, they hold your public and private keys that interface with the blockchain so you can access your balance, send money and manage your funds. The public key allows others to send money to the public key only. A wallet that is "offline" (see Hardware or Paper below) cannot access funds or send money unless it is accessed with another form of wallet, either desktop, online, or mobile.
1) Desktop Wallet - Installed on your computer and are only accessible from that SINGLE computer. Very secure but if someone hacks your computer you are exposed. 2) Online Wallet - Run remotely (cloud based) and are far more convenient to access but make them more vulnerable as they are controlled by a third party and are also vulnerable to hacking attacks. Exchange wallets are online wallets but you are not in control of the private key. View it as a wallet that is lended to you so you can trade. The wallet is technically not yours. 3) Mobile - Ran on an app and are useful as they can be used anywhere including retail stores 4) Hardware - Private keys are stored on a tangible device like a USB drive. They can make transactions online but they are stored offline. Compatible with web interfaces and support many but not all currencies. To use, plug into a computer, enter a pin, send currency and confirm. Safest form of storage. 5) Paper - Basically a physical printout of your private and public keys. It is not stored online anywhere and the only way transactions can happen is if you transfer money with the help of an Online wallet.
Example of a Public Key = 1A684DbsHQKPVCWgaUsYdF4uQGwTiA9BFT Example of a Private Key = E9873D79C6D87DC0FB6A5778633389F4453213303DA61F20BD67FC233AA33262
Most wallets provide a Recovery Mnemonic Passcode that is a series of words (typically 12 to 24 words) in a specific order. If you lose your login information for your wallet you can supply the mnemonic passcode and retrieve your lost login information. If you lose your login information and your mnemonic passcode your wallet will be inaccessible and your tokens are lost to you. The above basically describes a first generation Blockchain Cryptocurrency such as Bitcoin. It is used basically as currency with no centralized entity regulating the release of additional currency and keeping the ledger of where the money is going secure and extremely safe from manipulation.
Second Generation Blockchain
The second generation blockchains sprung out of this environment with something more valuable. Utilizing the blockchain system to allow applications to be ran on top of a decentralized secure system. Instead of just recording transactions, contracts could be transmitted the same way. More complex transactions (SMART CONTRACTS) allow for things such as: - Funds to be spent only when a required percentage of people agree - Manage agreements between users (such as insurance) - Provide utility to other contracts - Store information about an application such as domain registration information or membership records This basically can allow applications to be ran on top of the blockchain system. This can cut out the middleman for many real-world applications (mortgages, banking, communications, security confirmations etc.)
Proof of Work/Proof of Stake
As I mentioned earlier, Proof of Work (PoW) requires nodes to solve a mathematical puzzle which is rewarded with tokens. Proof of Stake (PoS) is different, the tokens with proof of stake systems are pre-mined meaning they are all created when the blockchain system is created. Blocks are not verified by the typical method. The block validator uses the blockchain software to stake their tokens and are chosen based on specific factors depending on how many tokens the person holds and for how long. Depending on how many tokens they hold will restrict the quantity of blocks they can validate. If they own more they can validate more often but all validators will be chosen randomly keeping the rewards fairly distributed (unlike PoW which typically reward the first completed.) The blockchain still requires a mathematical puzzle to be solved but it is much easier than PoW requiring far less time and energy. If the blockchain has premined all of their tokens then new tokens cannot be mined for rewards in PoS. The reward for staking your tokens to be a validator is a portion of the transaction fee that is charged as part of normal transactions on the blockchain. That is why PoS miners are called forgers. If manipulation is attempted than their stake can be taken from their wallet adding more motivation to prevent data manipulation.
Fork
Some cryptocurrencies may need to update or upgrade the coding of their blockchain software. When this happens usually a fork occurs. This basically means the cryptocurrency splits into two separate cryptocurrencies. Because the nature of blockchain technology, they are decentralized and autonomous so the older version cannot be deleted or removed. If people choose to continue using the old version they can. For mining/forging purposes the nodes will need to choose which they will mine/forge and download the blockchain software on their computer to proceed. When the fork occurs, anyone holding tokens in the original currency will be given the same number of tokens in the forked currency. (When Bitcoin forked to Bitcoin Cash, anyone holding x amount of Bitcoin would receive a new wallet for Bitcoin Cash also containing x amount of Bitcoin Cash.) This is called a Hard Fork and all previous transactions are made invalid. There are also Soft Forks, in this case it is backwards compatible and all previous transactions are valid. This can result in two currencies but in most cases, it doesn’t as it is usually accepted by most miners/forgers because it is backwards compatible.
Exchanges
Online currency exchanges allow you to buy, sell or exchange fiat money (USD, EUR, etc) with digital currencies or in most cases digital currencies for other digital currencies. There are a large variety of different exchanges that are operated in multiple countries but there are around a dozen that the majority of cryptocurrency trading volume are present on. Not all cryptocurrencies will be listed on all exchanges, some have specific prerequisites to be listed on their exchange and there may be fees associated as well. Once your account is set up you will have a list of all available cryptocurrencies to trade. Each currency will have an associated online wallet with the public key address allowing you to send that specific currency to that wallet. (Many exchanges are having delayed or canceled identity verification, currency transfers and lack sufficient customer support due to the influx of new traders) Examples of top exchanges: 1) Coinbase (trades fiat) 2) GDAX (trades fiat) 3) Gemini (trades fiat) 4) Changelly (trades fiat) 5) Bittrex 6) Binance 7) HitBTC 8) EtherDelta 9) Bitfinex 10) Kraken 11) Bithumb 12) Bitstamp 13) Poloniex 14) OKEx
Sending/Receiving Tokens
All wallets have the ability to send digital currency to other wallets. The function is relatively easy, make sure the currency you are sending is going to the appropriate wallet for that currency. Ethereum tokens cannot be sent to a Bitcoin wallet for example. (The tokens aren’t actually moving location; the list of transactions/ownership is what is stored in the wallet). Triple check the wallet private key you are sending the tokens to. If you type the wrong address the tokens will be lost in nearly all incidents. Some mobile wallets allow you to scan a QR code that will automatically enter the public key rather than copying/pasting or typing out the public key.
Taxes
As of January 1, 2018 it appears that taxing on digital currency has changed. Every trade between any digital currencies (Bitcoin to Ether, Ether to Litecoin etc) will be a taxable transaction. If you hold the currency for longer than one year than you will pay capital gain tax when it is traded or sold (15%-20%) and if you sell or trade in less than a year you will have to add the profit to your taxable income to adjust your tax bracket.
Altcoins
Altcoins are basically any coin that is not Bitcoin. Most cryptocurrencies do not have a native blockchain (their own independent dedicated blockchain). Bitcoin, Ether, Ripple, Waves, NXT, Cardano all have their own native blockchain. Many other cryptocurrencies run on other cryptocurrency’s blockchains. Litecoin runs on Bitcoins blockchain, hundreds run on the Ethereum blockchain. These currencies act as smart contracts running on the adopted blockchain.
DApps (Decentralized Applications)
For a blockchain application to be considered a DApp it must be 1) Open source, code available to all 2) Decentralized, uses blockchain cryptographic tech 3) Incentive, must have tokens to fuel itself 4) Algorithm/Protocol, generates tokens and has a built-in consensus mechanism (mining/forging.)
There are 3 types of DApps, each basically piggybacks off the platform of the previous Type 1 – Have their own blockchain (like bitcoin) Type 2 – Use the blockchain of Type 1 DApps Type 3 – Use the protocol of Type 2 DApps
ICO (Initial Coin Offering)
Much like an IPO (Initial Public Offering) that offers stock in a private company to the public, an ICO raises money for new Cryptocurrency ventures. Typically, a minimum investment is required in the form of a cryptocurrency such as Bitcoin or Ether and the investor is given tokens of the cryptocurrency at a reduced cost. Due to the fact that ICO’s are so new, government agencies have not begun regulating these ventures making them extremely risky as anyone with a competent coder can create and market a cryptocurrency that can be used to swindle investors who aren’t cautious. The US government no longer allows its citizens to participate in ICO’s and if you are using a computer with an IP address located in the United States, ICO’s websites will not allow you to invest.
Research
1) Whitepapers – Each cryptocurrency will have their own dedicated websites and most will have a whitepaper that has a description of what their cryptocurrency is designed to do. 2) Roadmaps – Also on each cryptocurrency’s website, they tend to have a roadmap or timeline as to when they are planning to complete certain milestones be it added features to the blockchain or wallet or any other important events. 3) Coinmarketcap.com – List of every available cryptocurrency, the exchanges they trade on, market cap, trade volume, available tokens, newly created tokens etc. 4) Reddit.com (cryptocurrency subreddit) – Subreddits focused on cryptocurrency as well as specific subreddits focused on individual cryptocurrencies. Be cautious as many people on these sites are uninformed and/or are trying to manipulate the market by fooling others to buy or sell based on fraudulent information. 5) Bitcointalk.org – Forums specific to individual cryptocurrencies. There is a lot of self-marketing (bounties) on this site. Take what they say with a grain of salt 6) TwitteFacebook (Social Media) – Many times news from team members or the cryptocurrency’s social media page will break news before it is listed on any of the above-mentioned outlets. Find out who is working for the cryptocurrency you are interested in and start following the team’s social media. Don’t forget to look at their linkedin accounts if available, previous employment and behavioral history to confirm they are competent. 7) Github - Code from projects can be uploaded here and reviewed for issues and revisions.
Common Terms/Slang
Shilling – covert advertising, personally endorsing a token so as to manipulate the price to either recoup a loss or increase gains on a token the individual owns. FUD – Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt; another method to manipulate the price of a token the person owns by making others second guess their investment decision on a specific token. FOMO – Fear Of Missing Out; buying a token (usually after the price has already increased) hoping they haven’t missed the majority of a price increase. Shitcoin – A cryptocurrency that has become worthless overtime or a scam operation. To the Moon – Massive increase in a token’s price.
I'm sure there are probably revisions to be done on this as I am still getting my head around all of the concepts. Any help to this would be appreciated.
submitted by Truantlife to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Cryptocurrency Terms And Definitions - Common Crypto Words To Know

The blockchain community is not left out when it comes to the use of jargon and phrases. The use of words that look strange to those who are not involved in crypto is totally inevitable. It’s definitely going to be difficult for anyone not in this space to understand words like “ERC20, ICO or gas. So in order to help such people out, we have made a list of the most common cryptocurrency terms and definitions. Please sit back and enjoy your ride.

Cryptocurrency Terms And Definitions
One can categorize these terms into various parts. First of all, we will deal with general cryptocurrency terms and definitions.

Blockchain
Blockchains are distributed ledgers which are secured by cryptography. Everyone has access to read the information on every blockchain which means they are essentially public databases but the data update can only be done by the data owners. In the case of blockchains, data doesn’t remain on a single centralized server, they are copied across hundreds of thousands of computers worldwide. Projects such as Ethereum, Vechain, EOS etc. fall under this class of technology.
Mining: The means of trying to ‘solve’ the next available block. One needs huge amounts of computer processing power to carry this out effectively. There is always a reward for doing this.
Mining rig: A specially designed computer that processes proof-of-work blockchains such as Ethereum. They consist of multiple high-end graphic processors (GPUs) so as to maximize their processing power.
Node: This is a computer that has a copy of the blockchain and is working to keep it in a good shape.
PoW: The full meaning of this is Proof-of-work. The Ethereum network currently makes use of this algorithm.
PoS: Its full meaning is Proof-of-stake. It is the proposed future algorithm for Ethereum. Those that own ETH will be able to lock up all or a portion of their ether for a given amount of time in order to ‘vote’ and generate network consensus instead of mining in its current form. Stakeholders will get rewards in form of ETH by doing so.
Fork: This takes places when a certain blockchain splits into two different chains. This usually happens in the crypto space when new ‘governance rules’ are infused into the blockchain’s code.
Software wallet: A crypto-currency storage that exists purely on a computer as software files. You can generate these kinds of wallets for free from diverse sources. MyEtherWallet (MEW) is one of the most popular sources around.
Hardware wallet: A device that one can securely keep cryptocurrency. People often say that these wallets are the most secure way to store cryptocurrency. Examples of the most common hardware wallet models around are Ledger Nano S and Trezor.
Cold storage: This is a way of moving your cryptocurrency from an online wallet to an offline one, as a means of safekeeping them from hack. There are a lot of ways to carry this out. Some methods that are commonly used include:
· Using a hardware wallet to store your cryptocurrency.
· By printing out the QR code of a software wallet and keeping it somewhere which is safe.
· You can also move the files of a software wallet onto an external storage device such as USB drive and keeping it somewhere safe.

Trading Related Cryptocurrency Terms And Definitions
Exchange: These are websites where people trade (buy and sell) their cryptocurrencies. Some of the popular crypto exchanges we have around include Binance, Poloniex, Bittrex etc.
Market order / market buy / market sell: A sale or purchase which is made on an exchange at the current price. A market buy acquires the cheapest Bitcoin available on the order book while a market sell fills up the most high-priced buy order on the books.
Limit order / limit buy / limit sell: These are orders which are placed by traders to buy or sell a cryptocurrency when the price reaches a certain amount. They are pretty much like ‘for-sale’ signs you see on goods.
Sell wall / buy wall: Cryptocurrency traders are able to see the current limit buy and sell points using a depth chart. The chart’s graphical representation is very much like a wall.
FIAT: Refer to a government-issued currency. An example is the US dollar.
Whale: A person who owns huge amounts of cryptocurrency.
Margin trading: This is an act of increasing the intensity of a trade by using your existing coins. It is very risky for an inexperienced trader to partake in this. Stay safe!!
Going long: This is a margin trade that gives profit if the price goes up.
Going short: It is a margin trade that gives profit if the price goes down.
Bullish: Being optimistic that the price of cryptocurrency is going to increase.
Bearish: This is an expectation that the price of cryptocurrency is going to decrease.
ATH: This simply means All-Time-High. This is the highest point that has been reached by a particular coin or token. Take for instance, Bitcoin’s ATH is about $20,000 and this was achieved around December 2017 and January 2018.
Altcoin: A word used to qualify other cryptocurrencies which is not Bitcoin. Examples of altcoins are Ripple, NEO, EOS, Vechain, Electroneum etc.
Tokens: These are ‘currency’ of projects which are hosted on the ethereum network. They raise money by issuing their own tokens to the general public. Tokens have a significant use in the project's ecosystem. Examples of tokens are Enjin Coin (ENJ), Zilliqa (ZIL), OmiseGO (OMG), Augur (REP) etc.
ICO: The full meaning is Initial Coin Offering. This is synonymous to an IPO in the non-crypto world. Startups give out their own token in exchange for Bitcoin or ether.
Shilling / pumping: An act of advertising another cryptocurrency. It is mostly done in a way that tricks as many people as possible into believing that a coin or token will get to a higher price in the future.
Market Cap: This is the total value of a cryptocurrency. To calculate this, one has to multiply the total supply of coins by the current market price. You can get a run-down of several cryptocurrency projects on Coinmarketcap.
Stable coin: This is a cryptocurrency which has an extremely low volatility. You can use a stable coin to trade against the overall crypto market.
Arbitrage: A situation where a trader takes advantage of a difference in the price of the same coin / token on two different exchanges.
FOMO: Simply means Fear Of Missing Out. That overwhelming feeling that one needs to get on board when there is a massive rise in the price of a commodity. This is also applicable in the crypto space.
FUD: Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt. It is a baseless negativity which is spread intentionally by someone or a group of people who want the price of cryptocurrency to decrease.
FUDster: A person who spreads FUD.
Pump And Dump: This happens when an altcoin gets a ton of attention, leading to a massive increase in price, and likewise followed by a big price crash of that altcoin.
ROI: Return on Investment. The percentage profit a trader makes on an initial investment (i.e. A 100% ROI simply indicates that a trader doubled his money).
TA: Trend Analysis or Technical Analysis. A way of examining current coin charts so as to make predictions for the next market movement.

Next, we will be moving on to crytocurrency terms and definitions that are ethereum related.
Dapp: Decentralized Application. It is an application that uses a decentralized peer-to-peer network like Ethereum smart contract as its back-end code.
Bagholder: A person who still holds on to a particular altcoin despite having a pump and dump crash.
Smart contract: This is a code that is deployed onto the Ethereum blockchain, it often helps with the direct interaction of how money flows from one point to another.
The Flippening: A future event showing the capacity of Ethereum’s market cap (or some other cryptocurrency) surpassing Bitcoin’s market cap, making Ethereum the most ‘valuable’ crypto-currency.
Gas: It is a measurement of the amount of processing needed by the ethereum network to execute a transaction. More complex transactions like deploying a smart contract onto the network requires more gas than sending ether from one wallet to another which is obviously a simpler operation.
Gas price: This is the amount of ether an initiator of a transaction is willing to spend for each gas unit on a transaction. The higher the gas price, then the faster the processing of the transaction.
Wei: It is the smallest denomination of ether.
Gwei: This is a denomination of ether (ETH). Gwei is the unit for measuring gas prices. 1 Ether = 1,000,000,000 Gwei (109).
MEW: MyEtherWallet is a site where users can generate ethereum wallets for free.

We also have a handful of cryptocurrency terms and definitions that are memes. See some of them below;
Hodl: People use this word when signifying that a person is keeping his coins / tokens for a long period of time. A couple of years back, someone on a Bitcoin forum made a post with a typo HODL in place of HOLD. Ever since then, this term has become one of the most popularly used term in crypto.
Mooning: In crypto, this term comes to play when the price of cryptocurrencies move up astronomically.
Lambo: This is highly synonymous with crypto. You can't leave out this word when discussing about cryptocurrency terms and definitions. This is the car we’re all goona buy when crypto makes us rich.
This is gentlemen: People use this phrase when pointing out positive things that are currently taking place in the cryptosphere.

Now that you are conversant with some of the commonly used cryptocurrency terms and definitions, you can now go out there and showcase your new crypto vocabulary to the world.
submitted by Satonova19 to u/Satonova19 [link] [comments]

The Quest for Fair Mining: did we come to a conclusion?

As cryptocurrency space matures every year, it becomes less of a thought experiment and more of a product or a solution to a problem. However, I still think that there is still a huge room for experimentation in the field and that there are lots of concepts that are still yet to be expanded upon and clarified. One of these concepts is Fair Mining initiative. Fair Mining was mentioned first in a Bitcoin whitepaper by Satoshi Nakamoto, where he said that the most honest and decentralised model of governance for blockchain is “one CPU = one vote”. However, Bitcoin did not fulfill the vision of Satoshi, as it is not really decentralized at this moment. Is it bad? Not necessarily. Should we say that complete fairness and decentralization is impossible and stop finding other solutions? Not at all. This thought led me to research a wide array of different CPU-only cryptocurrencies. Most of them are made by hobbyists and feature very vibrant (hobbyist as well) communities. Some of you may remember the meteoric rise of Ravencoin that even got listed on Binance. Some of you may know about Nerva or Masari. Anyway, these are all legit CPU-mineable projects and I am not going to dive deep into their specifics. After I researched about them I wanted to try to find coins that are even more obscure at the moment and that don’t have many eyes on even from mining communities.
 
One of the coins that got my attention was Blur. If you check my post history, you can find a writeup on /Cryptomoonshots about it. As I told everyone in that post, I was really looking forward to the future of it because the creator promised an extensive update in the future. Few days ago he made that update and I thought that it deserves a post on /Cryptocurrency.
 
So, this is the short explanation of the update if you wish to check it for yourself. In short, the project, which was initially a CPU-only coin, addresses the fact that the GPUs and ASICs would try to game the system and find breaches that will allow them to mine coins and profit from this. Instead of always being on high alert and ready to patch the code to reject the entrance of GPUs and ASICs, Blur introduces PPoW, Parallel Proof of Work system, which features discretionary, non-competitive mining on independent chains within the same ecosystem. This means that aside from the high-priority main chain Blur features two side-chains as well, one for ASICs, other for GPUs with different rates of coin swap (so ASICs get less than GPU who get even less than CPUs).
 
I am really curious about this update and the future of Blur because in my opinion this is the closest as we got at the moment to the concept of fair mining, because the Blur blockchain is now completely inclusive, while still prioritising CPUs. So, my questions that I wanted to discuss with /CC would be:
submitted by dyel_lives_matter to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

What Is The Most Profitable GPU Mineable Coin?  Ethereum ETC Zcash Ubiq Dbix  August 2017 Most Profitable Mining Rig In 2019 Is?... SIGNATUM - THE MOST PROFITABLE GPU MINEABLE COIN  $900 PER WEEK WITH 450MHS GPU MINING 2020 PROFIT - March Update! bitcoin bitcoin mining 2020 crypto Most Profitable Cryptocurrency to Mine Jan 2020 GPU Mining VS Asic Mining In 2019  Which Is More Profitable? Should YOU be GPU MINING Cryptocurrency in 2020?! - YouTube GPU Mining Ethereum Raven June 2019 Worth it ?

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What Is The Most Profitable GPU Mineable Coin? Ethereum ETC Zcash Ubiq Dbix August 2017

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